Announcing WormBase ParaSite Release 9

We are pleased to announce the ninth release of WormBase ParaSite.  In this release, we have included genomes for two new species (Ditylenchus destructor – PRJNA312427 and Taenia saginata – PRJNA71493) and an additional alternative genome for one species (Taenia asiatica – PRJNA299871).  This brings the total number of genomes to 134, representing 114 species.  Additionally, all WormBase core species have been updated to release WS258.

As part of this release, we have introduced a new genome browser: JBrowse (example for S. mansoni).  This offers a fast and interactive experience for all genomes.  Custom tracks can be attached directly from a local computer, without needing to upload any data.  This makes JBrowse ideal for visualising large data files, without the need to download or install any additional software.  Other features include combination tracks for visualising multiple files as a single track, and sequence search tracks for locating short sequence motifs within the genome.

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Featured paper: The Echinococcus canadensis (G7) Genome

Tapeworms of the Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species complex cause the zoonotic disease echinococcosis. Maldonado et al, from the Kamenetzky group at the University of Buenos Aires, have recently reported the genome assembly and annotation of one of the members of this species complex, Echinococcus canadensis (G7 genotype). The genome paper additionally describes a number of comparative analyses between E. canadensis (G7), E. canadensis (G1) and E. multilocularis, based on gene orthology, genome-wide SNP analyses and identification of regulatory features.

Version 1 of the E. canadensis (G7) genome is currently available in WormBase ParaSite, with version 2 becoming available in release 10.

Travel bursaries announced for Hydra conference

Up to 3 awards will be made for early-career researchers from Africa, Asia and Latin America to support participation at the meeting; the bursaries will cover registration fees (GBP 495, approx USD 625), and a sum of USD 1000 towards airfare and ground transportation costs. Awardees will be selected on the basis of Abstracts submitted to the conference, and a letter of application outlining the reasons for attending the meeting. Applicants should register through this website and send their application letter to Hydra@ed.ac.uk before the closing date of 31 March 2017.

Conference website: http://hydra.bio.ed.ac.uk/

 

Registration open for BSP Spring Meeting 2017

Registration is now open for the British Society for Parasitology Spring Meeting, to be held in Dundee from 2nd April to 5th April 2017.

WormBase ParaSite will be present throughout the conference, including a workshop session.  We will also be available to answer questions and provide practical demonstrations.  More details will follow.

Abstract submission deadlines:
Oral presentation – 19th February 2017
Poster – 5th March 2017

More details and registration for the conference: http://bsp.uk.net/2016/10/04/bsp-spring-meeting-2017/

We look forward to seeing you in Dundee!

Molecular Helminthology Meeting in Cape Cod (19th-22nd March 2017)

Registration remains open for the “Molecular Helminthology: An Integrated Approach” conference, which will be held from 19th to 22nd March 2017 at the Hyannis Resort and Conference Center, Cape Cod, MA, USA.

Late abstract submissions are accepted until 31st January 2017.

WormBase ParaSite will be hosting a workshop at this meeting. Join us between 10:00 and 10:45 on Monday 20th March to learn more about WormBase ParaSite.

Further details and registration: http://www.molecular-helminthology-conference.com/

Featured Paper: Nuclear hormone receptors in parasitic helminths

I would like to draw your attention to the review on the evolution of “nuclear hormone receptors in parasitic helminths” by Wenjie Wu and Philip LoVerde published in the Journal for Molecular Cell Endocrinology in 2011.

It gives an overview on how nuclear receptors (NR) evolved in platyhelminths and nematodes. By searching for a cited accession number (a.e. AY395038 , which is the Schistosoma mansoni SmTRα receptor) on ParaSite you can easily find the respective gene and visualise the evolutionary relationships in the Ortholog/GeneTree section.

screenshot-from-2016-10-21-11-35-22

(SmTRα – the red rectangle marks the duplication event, the red highlighting the queried gene)